Super-Easy RDF and Knowledge Graphs
  Mark Wallace   Mark Wallace
Ontologist, Software Architect
Semantic Arts, Inc.
https://semanticarts.com/mark.wallace
 


 

Monday, October 14, 2019
08:30 AM - 11:45 AM

Level:  Technical (may include code)


RDF (the Resource Description Framework) is a worldwide standard knowledge graph technology that has been around since 1999, but its uptake has been relatively slow. Newer, nonstandard graph technologies that arrived on the scene 10 years later are seeing faster adoption. This, even though RDF is arguably better suited to web architecture and web scale, data integration, and automated reasoning.

Why is this?

I believe it is because RDF is perceived as too complicated. It uses URIs as identifiers, is described in mostly formal (mathematically rigorous) documentation, has complicated-looking XML serializations, etc.

The goal of this session is to lower your barrier of entry with RDF. While RDF does indeed have a formal basis, and a great many useful and web-centric features, not all of these need to be understood or used to get started. In this session attendees will:

  •  Get hands-on with RDF (so bring your laptop!)
  •  Experience schema-less/schema-as-you-go modeling
  •  Rapidly build a knowledge graph
  •  Query the knowledge graph
  •  Get a taste for RDF's other valuable features like automated reasoning, data integration, and data reuse
  •  Most importantly, LEARN NOT TO FEAR RDF!


Mark is an ontologist and software architect/developer with over 30 years of experience designing and building software and data-centric systems for government and commercial clients. He got into the Semantic Web in 2004, and his experience ranges from pure ontology development to large-scale RDF applications with billions of triples. Mark has been an author and invited speaker in the Semantic Web community since 2009. With Semantic Arts, Mark gets to apply a broad range of skills including ontology modeling, software development, and project management. Mark holds a bachelor's degree in Computer Science from the University of Central Florida. Go Knights!